7 Outdated Sales Closing Techniques That Are Flat Out Terrible!

Written by Leslie Ye

In Glengarry Glen RossAlec Baldwin plays Blake, a belligerent trainer sent to shake up a tired, underperforming sales team.

Blake storms into a room of unsuspecting reps and starts screaming about prospects. “Only one thing counts in this life — get them to sign on the line which is dotted!” Fortunately for Blake, his character claims to have earned $970,000 in a year. Unfortunately, he’s dead wrong about what ultimately counts in sales. Even in the age of Glengarry Glen Ross, when “Always Be Closing” was the mantra echoing in sales reps’ heads, he was wrong.

The old sales playbook — dragging prospects through a sales process and strong-arming them into a purchase — only worked because there was no better way for buyers to buy.

Today, things have changed. Buyers have access to more information and more options than ever, and salespeople who still operate under the ‘Always Be Closing’ model will find that ironically, more doors than ever are closing on them.

Many sales tactics have changed with the times. But closing is an area where reps still struggle.

It’s easy to see why. The idea that prospects need to be “closed” is, in and of itself, a dated concept. Today, salespeople educate prospects so they can decide on their own whether they’ll buy or not.

“Closing” shouldn’t be something that gets done to prospects. Instead, it should be a mutually agreed-upon outcome that’s a natural byproduct of a helpful, educational sales process.

Traditional closing tactics are left over from an old era of sales. These techniques are particularly cringe-worthy — avoid them at all costs.

1) The Assumptive Close
As its name suggests, the assumptive close operates under the assumption that a prospect is going to buy, even when they haven’t explicitly said so. Reps will ask prospects things like, “So what day should we get started?” in the hopes their buyers will get in the mindset of purchasing the product. Read More

Whose Job Is It?

Think About It… If this business were really about having the best products and sales ideas like people are telling you, then why are 90% of the new advisors failing and why is the average income for advisors only $30,000-50,000?

The truth is, that contrary to what you may believe, the vast majority of insurance companies, IMOs, agencies, and brokerage firms are not going to spend a lot of their time and money training and coaching you on marketing and sales! Their main focus is on recruiting agents and product training. It’s not their job to make you a superstar salesperson. Their job is to provide you with the best products and teach you how they work.

Consider, if a company hires you as an engineer or accountant are they going to train you… or do they expect you to already have and stay up to date on the specific knowledge and skills needed for the job?

If you really want to succeed today, then isn’t it up to you to get the very best life insurance and annuity marketing and sales knowledge, skills and training you need to do your job?

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Jeremy Nason, RFC is the co-founder of the famous Insurance Pro Shop™ -“The first affordable, full-service insurance marketing and sales resource center for today’s Financial Pro, and Found Money Management™a system dedicated to helping Middle-Income Families to ‘Live Debt Free and Truly Wealthy!’ For more articles visit his blog!